New Year´s Eve in Berlin

New Year's Eve in BerlinOne of Europe’s largest open air parties  is celebrated on New Year’s Eve in Berlin, between Brandenburg Gate and the Victory Column. Together, about one million people await the beginning of a new year.

New Year’s Eve in Berlin

On New Year’s Eve Berlin invites its guests and residents to celebrate the beginning of a new year with a great open air party. Each year bands and DJs attract about one million people to party along the “Straße des 17. Juni”, between Brandenburg Gate and Victory Column until the early morning hours of the 1st of January.
At midnight a massive firework marks the start of the new year.

New Year’s Eve between Brandenburg Gate and Victory Column

The party area comprises two kilometres from Brandenburg Gate along the “Straße des 17. Juni” until the Victory Column. The festival programme includes music acts, international stars and performances, light shows, food from all over the world as well as the famous firework. The party has no definite ending.

Security Checks at the Entrances

At the entrances of the festival mile security checks take place. Any kind of firework is strictly prohibited. Pointed and sharp items as well as items which can be used as weapons, are not allowed to be carried inside the party area. The same counts for glass bottles and big bags.

New Year´s Eve at wombat´s

If you don´t want to celebrate New Year´s Eve among millions of people and you are one of the lucky persons staying at wombat´s CITY Hostel Berlin, the roof terrace and bar might be the place to be. You´ll have an amazing view over Berlin´s city center and our wombar offers drinks at reasonable prices, specials and Happy Hours.

For more Info on New Year´s Eve in Berlin visit https://www.berlin.de/en/events/2947764-2842498-new-years-eve-party.en.html

New Year´s Eve in Munich

Tollwood Festival Munich

The Bavarian capital Munich, or München to the locals, is one of Germany’s busiest cities when it comes to celebrations. People are on the streets for New Year´s Eve in munich and celebrate in public with their neighbours, with large scale fireworks displays held across the city, lighting up the skyline as midnight strikes.

Munich is often reduced to the consumption of german beer and sausages, but the New Year´s Eve in Munich has more to offer. The big event in Munich over the holiday season is the famous Tollwood Winter festival on the Theresienwiese. The festival actually starts earlier in December and incorporates live entertainment including live music and circus acts before actually ending in December 31st with a last final big party and fireworks display at the  Tollwood New Years Eve Party “Silvester on the Beach”.

It is the biggest New Year’s party in Munich and boasts 5 huge areas enclosed in tents with a wide range of live bands and DJs including Independent, Rock, Alternative, Latin, Salsa, Reggae, Hiphop, Funk, Soul, Disco and boogie. Away from the Tollwood event, crowds gather at various points across the city to watch the famous midnight fireworks displays. Popular vantage points include Englischer Garten and the Bayerischer Hof while the area around the Friedensengel peace angel offers fantastic panoramic views of the city.

The Olympic Park and the city’s iconic Marienplatz also attract large numbers of visitors, with the latter in particular enjoying a thriving trade in it’s many bars and restaurants throughout the evening.

If you are searching for a good place to start and end the party, we´d recommend our wombar at wombat´s CITY Hostels Munich. With specials, cocktail and beer happy hours and reasonably priced drinks all evening long the vivid wombar might just be the place to start.

See also:

http://www.newyearsevelive.net/cities/munich.html

http://www.tollwood.de/

 

Discover Berlin

Berlin. So much history, so much to see and do. Berlin is my favorite city in Europe and every time I go back, I love it even more. Walking into the wombat’s there gave me a sense of familiarity, as it has the same look and friendly feel as the one I’ve been to in Munich. The location is also as equally convenient, right by a tram and train station, Rosa Luxemburg Platz. Helpful staff, clean rooms, and an awesome rooftop bar with great Happy Hour specials!

Knowing backpackers are on a budget, the front desk gave me some excellent suggestions on free stuff to do around Berlin. The first night there, however, I headed up to the bar to check out the view and make some new friends. With a free pool table and 5 EUR pitchers, that wasn’t very hard to do. :)

My new wombat’s friends and I decided to go on the Alternative Art Walk the next day, which was one of the recommendations wombat’s gave us. We met in the Lustgarten at 11:30am (not too early after a night in Berlin!) and the guide started telling us about the street art culture in Berlin. We went all around the city and looked at sculptures, graffiti, countless murals, and ended at the East Side Gallery, the longest section of the Berlin Wall still remaining.

We realized how often we walk around a city while touring and don’t actually SEE a lot of what is there, right in front of us. For the next few days, I started noticing all the art on buildings, street signs, shop windows, etc., that I wouldn’t have looked for before this tour. It was really informative and a cool way to learn about the artistic, edgy Berlin culture.

A friend and I also decided to check out the tour of the Reichstag (German Parliament building) dome, which is also free. The only drawback is that you have to make a reservation in advance, which we stood in line to do for about 30 minutes. It was worth it, though, and taught us a ton about the history of German government. You can see all the important landmarks from the top of the dome, which the tour points out as well.

Getting some really good use out of my boots, we walked all around to discover Berlin, visiting the Holocaust Memorial, the Berlin Cathedral, the Brandenburg Gate, and the Otto Weidt Museum (all free). Luckily there are street food stands with Glühwein (warm spiced wine) and Currywurst (a Berlin favorite) everywhere along the way!

Lastly of my free excursions, I decided to go to the Topography of Terror, which is more of an exhibition than a museum. It’s intense, a lot of reading, and a lot of disturbing Holocaust imagery. It’s worth a visit if you are interested in learning more about the dark history of Germany during World War II.

For those who are lucky enough to have a smartphone while traveling, the Berlin transit app, “BVG”, was incredibly valuable. You can simply put in your destination and it will give you a timetable and route using bus, tram, train, or a combination of the three. I bought a 7 day transit pass for 28 EUR, which was valid for any form of public transit. Berlin is big, so it was worth it since I was there for so long and covering a lot of ground.

As for nightlife, there are a thousand options due to the diversity of people in Berlin. I would tell the wombat’s crew what kind of party/event you are looking for, and they can point you in the right direction. Just be prepared for a late night because I don’t think the bars ever close! If you are there during late November/December, be sure to stop by the Christmas markets for some food, warm drinks, and shopping, there are several scattered around the city.

Overall, another great experience in a colorful, historic, and extremely diverse city. Yep, Berlin is still my favorite.

Happy travels!

Kiraly utca Budapest

NYE in Budapest

Kiraly Street is the place to be in Budapest! All the restaurants and ruin pubs are a couple minutes walk from wombat’s in Budapest, making this location absolutely ideal. As I walked into the lobby, I saw a diverse group of backpackers playing pool and a few sitting at tables looking at maps, no doubt deciding where to go next. What a cool traveler community this is!

I got to Budapest by train, so ended up taking a metro line to Kiraly street where I then walked to wombat’s. Travel time from the train station was approximately 10 minutes, and I had no problem finding it based on website directions. Just don’t forget to exchange your money as Hungary’s currency is the Forint, not the Euro.

At the reception, wombat’s also suggests a few free walking tours, which are a great way to see the city. I walked 90% of the time, even though it was winter, to get where I was going. I would suggest taking a few hours to go through The House of Terror, a museum that details both the Nazi and Communist eras in Hungary. The building itself was the headquarters of several of these groups and it held many political prisoners. Very intense, but interactive, educational, and worth seeing.

In Budapest there are events called Sparties, or “Spa Parties” at the thermal baths. It is basically a thermal bath turned into a nightclub, complete with drinks, mist, lights, and music. Even though clubs aren’t typically my scene, I had to do it for the experience. I bought a ticket for the New Year’s Eve Sparty and it was definitely fun and different, and something I haven’t seen anywhere else in the world! Being winter, it was cold getting out of the pool, but I would imagine in the summer it is just perfect.

Lastly, other than all the obvious historical sights, I highly suggest going to a few ruin pubs. My favorite was Szimpla Kert, a popular ruin pub about 5 minutes walk from wombat’s. It has an outdoor area for hookah, and several rooms full of random decorations. Don’t worry if there is a long line, it moves extremely fast!

My experience at wombat’s in Budapest was awesome and I can’t wait to go back! Budapest is definitely one of those cities that has fascinating historical sights mixed with fantastic food and nightlife. I will definitely be back!

Christmas market at Vienna city hall

Christmas in Vienna

Christmas away from home can be hard for some people. Fortunately, wombat’s Vienna did everything they could to make it feel like being home for my holidays last year. Upon arriving on Christmas Eve, there was a nice Christmas tree, and Christmas cookies at reception. I love Christmas cookies, so this already made me extremely happy!

Wombat’s Vienna Naschmarkt is a stone’s throw from the U-Bahn station, making my walk through the Austrian winter extremely short, which I very much appreciated. There is also an open air market right across the street, which has dozens of shops to buy warm food and groceries. After I checked in, the friendly staff gave me two free drink tickets (bonus!) and informed me that because it was Christmas Eve, they would be serving a warm punch at the bar tonight for free. Who needs presents when you have warm punch?

I decided to go on the free walking tour wombat’s has the next day. It was extremely cold out, but there was still a big group bundled up and ready to go! Our tour guide showed us around to a lot of the local sights, and I made friends with a few of my tour buddies!

Vienna is a beautiful, charming city and happens to be home of the original Wiener Schnitzel! There are several restaurants that specialize in schnitzel, so I would advise to do your research to decide which one to go to! Figlmüller seems to be the most popular, but make sure to make reservations in advance, as it fills up very quickly! I would also recommend enjoying some delicious Viennese coffee while you are there.

Nightlife it pretty diverse in Vienna, so I asked the wombat’s staff where to go based on my preferences. Turns out Christmas in Vienna has some special options in terms of nightlife. They had some great insight and made some recommendations that turned out to be just what I was looking for. I also spent some time at a couple of the Christmas markets, which are my favorite part of Europe in December. Nothing beats a mug of Glühwein (warm mulled wine) when its snowing outside.

It was cool to finally visit one of the original wombat’s on my trip around Europe. There is definitely a wombat’s theme, but each location has their own local flare. The most common similarities though, are the fantastic locations (both to public transport and activities) and the amazingly friendly staff. Thanks for making my Christmas in Vienna one to remember!

wombat's London Bar

wombat’s London

As a native English speaker, I was confident arriving in London that even though I’d never been there, I’d be able to figure out the train system. I was right, it is very straightforward and also has a smart phone app to help you figure out which trains to take where! The new wombat’s hostel in London is located very close to public transport making it super easy to find.

After getting off the tube at Tower Hill station, I noticed the magnificent medieval building right in front of me. What a great first impression. It was the Tower of London, a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. Upon arrival at wombat’s (about 10 minutes by foot from the station), I instantly felt at home. They have such an inviting lobby, with chairs and cushions, outlets everywhere, a luggage room, and smiling staff.

At reception I was given a booklet with a map of London and an incredibly helpful list of recommendations for sights, shopping, eating and drinking around town. After settling in, however, I headed down to have a drink at the womBar in the basement. WOW. This is by FAR the coolest hostel bar I have ever been to! The brick archways and unique decor give the bar a very cool, kitschy feel that I really enjoyed. The kitchen is also connected and is huge and fully stocked with cookware. I had my first pint of proper English Ale and started chatting with the other travelers, who were also having a great time.

As for the location, not only is wombat’s London close to a tube station, but it is also in the East part of London, which has a really cool bar scene. It’s outside of the Financial District, so in my opinion, more compatible with backpackers’ style. The bars here also stay open later than most, which is a bonus! This is also where all the Jack the Ripper tours start, because the East is where the murders took place.

There are several other free walking tours (with expected tip at the end) and countless tours that cost around 10 pounds. I highly recommend the Free Jack the Ripper tour as well as the Free Royal Tour which meets at The Churchill statue in Parliament Square.

If you are looking to see, eat, or drink something specific, the wombat’s staff are the best people to ask and have never steered me wrong. I have no doubt this new womBaby will become one of the most popular hostels in London in no time!w

Bear Pit Karaoke at Mauerpark Fleamarket

Wombat’s Top 4 Favourite Markets in Berlin

Spring has almost sprung in Berlin and what better way to celebrate the sun than to spend a hungover Sunday afternoon roaming around buying second hand goodies.  And let me tell you, there is no better way to cure a throbbing headache than walking back to the hostel with a freshly squeezed orange juice in one hand and a broken accordian in the other.

Berlin has quite a few markets on offer depending on what you’re in to.  This is a list of our favourites here at Wombat’s.

1) Mauerpark Flohmarkt (Sundays 8am –  6pm)

Located an easy 15minute walk from Wombat’s, ‚Mauerpark‘ (literally translating to ‚Wall Park‘ – it runs along one of the few remaining sections of the wall in the city) is easily one of the biggest and most famous fleamarkets in the city.  You can spend hours wandering through endless stalls selling all kinds of things from locally manufactured clothing to second hand watches to organic produce.

It can get pretty packed and busy though…so when the crowds are too much for you, grab a beer, have a lie down on the grass and listen to some of Berlins most eccentric street musicians doing their thing.  If you’re lucky, you might even get the chance to see the ‚Bearpit Karaoke‘ in full swing.  If you’ve ever wanted to butcher your favourite popsong outdoors in front of 400 people – Mauerpark is the place for you.

 

2) Flohmarkt am Boxhagener Platz (Sundays 10am – 6pm)

Smack bang in the middle of hipster suburb ‚Friedrichshain‘ is the small but extremely popular fleamarket on Boxhagener Platz.  Join the 20-somethings on their way back from the club, parents with their children and some of Berlin’s most stylish residents trawling through a huge amount of second hand books, records, furniture, clothing and other knick-knacks.

 

3) Turkish Market at Maybachufer (Tuesdays and Fridays 11am – 6.30pm)

‘Angebot angebot angebooooot!’  Every Tuesday and Friday, Kreuzbergs Maybach Canal comes alive with the sights and sounds of Turkish produce sellers offering visitors to the market the best deals on kilos of oranges/tomatoes/apples etc. etc. etc. It is not for the faint hearted – usually a huge bustling swarm of tourists, locals and families bargaining with shop-owners.  Towards the end of the market though, one can relax with a crowd of other exhausted market-goers sitting along the banks of the canal eating Turkish breads and dips and listening to street musicians.

 

4) Fleamarket at Rathaus Schöneberg (Saturday & Sunday 8am – 4pm)

Held in front of the Town Hall in district ‘Schöneberg’ (where John F Kennedy made his famous Ich bin ein Berliner speech) this fleamarket has more of a local character where Berliners come to buy and sell their Bric-a-Brac.  Sellers sit under tarpaulins and sell all kinds of random things out of cardboard boxes.  If you have the time to trawl through all the rubbish, it can be totally worth it.  But don’t forget…haggle!!

Free Tour in Munich – discover the city and have fun!

 

In association with Gordon’s Tours , Wombat’s proudly presents our budget city walking tour.

What better way to discover Munich’s delights than with a young professional guide. Our two to three hour tour starts everyday from Wombat’s reception at 10:45am. Our expert guides work on a pay as you wish basis and will provide you with insight into the city’s many historical and cultural sites. From Bratwurst to Beer Halls and from the Glockenspiel to the Surfers Wave, don’t miss this unique chance to discover Munich on a budget !

Price: you decide!!

Also try Gordon’s Dachau Memorial Tour. Gordon’s provides an officially authorized tour of the memorial site and have been working in cooperation with Wombat’s City Hostel Munich since 2007. The tour starts from Wombat’s reception everyday at 10:15. and takes between 4 and 5 hours.

Price: 22 euro

Students (or 26 and under) 20 euro

(all prices include travel cost)

For more information on these tours and others, please go to www.gordonstours.de.

“Vienna – Berlin the Art of two Cities”

Vienna - Berlin the Art of two Cities

copyright: Unteres Belvedere, Bildergalerie

Great Exhibition at Vienna´s Belvedere Palace

Visual Arts of Vienna and Berlin until the middle of June

Many travelers have both cities on their list and obviously Berlin and Vienna are famous for their creative atmosphere and cultural activities ever since. Never the less the outcome differs a lot. Until the middle of June you can visit a collection of historic paintings in one of Vienna´s most beautiful sights.

This rich collection of paintings takes the viewer into the period ranging from the turn of the century to the 1930s. With their gaze influenced by a multitude of clichés, the habitants of both big cities have observed each other – driven by curiosity, but also scepticism.

While Vienna was the capital of a multi-ethnic empire, Berlin was the up-and-coming metropolis of a united Germany. The old Habsburg Empire Vienna, the city of elegance opposed to Berlin, a dynamic metropolis, with a modern appearance. These are two cities that could not be more different but still had so much in common.

From Vienna Secession to Käthe Kollwitz

Following the founding of the Vienna Secession, in 1897, a similar artists’ association was established in Berlin. As different as both groups of artists were, they shared a similar international outlook in their opposition of the historicist-classicist traditions. In Berlin, this was reflected primarily in French impressionism, whereas in Vienna artists strived more for the total artwork. With his psychological portraits Oskar Kokoschka attracted the interest not just of the Viennese. Expressionism was certainly rampant in both cities.

While in Berlin artists compensated for the horrors of war with playful subversive force of Dada, in the economically weaker city of Vienna artists took up various variants of modernism.The spectrum extended from the German artist George Grosz who turned to big-city life with his critical-belligerent imagery, to Christian Schad who lived in both Vienna and Berlin and was known for his melancholy images of man, all the way to the Viennese chemist Franz Sedlacek with his magical imagery. They can all be seen in the exhibition, along with eminent works by artists such as Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, Raoul Hausmann, Max Liebermann, Max Oppenheimer and Egon Schiele. The Weber series by the German socialist artist Käthe Kollwitz captures the great misery in which the poor in both Vienna and Berlin lived.

source: wien.at

 

What´s around wombat´s Berlin

You´re looking for a good Bar, nice Café or facilties like a cash machine near wombat´s CITY HOSTEL BERLIN.

Just download this PDF to your device and you´re ready to explore our lovely neighborhood.

Wombats Berlin Neighborhood